Latest Updates

Sairaat’s Nagraj Manjule to direct Big B
Akshay Kumarto be seen in new avatar in Gold
Vidya Balan to do another woman-oriented film
PeeCee signsPankaj Parashar for Hindi film
Nikhil Advani’s Baazaarto roll, hunt on for leading lady

Making All The Noises

Producers Preety Ali and Pallavi Rohatgi, mentor Zoya Akhtar along with directors Amira Bhargava and Supriya Sharma, in conversation with Team Box Office India as their film, Shor Se Shuruaat hits the screens

vyg_8838

 

Box Office India (BOI): How did the project come about? Who approached whom?

Preety Ali (PA): Humara Movie did a similar project in 2014, called Shuruaat Ka Interval. We promote upcoming talent and we met more than a hundred directors in the last three years. Last time, ‘Interval’ was the subject, and then Vinay (Mishra) said, let’s release it, we did, in 2014.

Then we wanted to do it again but we couldn’t repeat what we had done two years ago. It suddenly struck me that we should take directors who have already made their mark in the industry, and let them give a chance to newcomers who they think deserve a chance.

Initially, I was afraid that these established directors would reject the idea, which is why I was very surprised when everyone I approached accepted the offer happily. In fact, we even emailed some of them, those we didn’t know, and they too agreed to come on board. So, it was all about established directors mentoring and grooming up-and-coming directors. Of course, known names always help a project.

vyg_8678BOI: Zoya, did you get a call or an email?

Zoya Akhtar (ZA):  I have known Preety for years, and when they told me the idea, I thought it was really exciting. It gives an opportunity to assistant directors, newcomers, to have something concrete on their reel. So this was a fantastic opportunity for young talent. Your first film is always your toughest. After that, you tend to get work if you have a spark. I think it was incredible to facilitate that. And we had to choose someone, that was also really nice. She (Amira Bhargava) has been my DA (director’s assistant) and it is amazing to make a short film at this age and get this kind of experience.

BOI: Was it an instinctive decision to mentor her and not any of your other assistants?

ZA: Yes but, also, we work in a different kind of system… I mean, my first assistant director is not Indian and is going to become a producer. Among the assistant directors, very few want to be directors. Most of them are producers, whereas the DAs, director’s assistants, want to be directors. Also, I had worked with her when she was referencing work for me. She was part of the whole process and I thought she was very bright. 

BOI: What was it about her story, Aamer, that grabbed you?

ZA: I liked seeing cinematic noise through someone else’s eyes. She made a very socially relevant comment on noise pollution in our city and on how immune we are to it, without actually talking about it, without actually saying we live in a noisy city. It is only when you see it from this perspective that you suddenly realise that it’s scary. I found that really interesting. 

vyg_8739BOI: How did Zoya break the news to you, to tell you that your story was selected?

Amira Bhargava (AB): We were editing an ad film and she was already in touch with Preety. One day, she just looked up and said to me, ‘Do you want to make a short film?’ I said yes, without giving it a second thought. I had no idea what it was, I just said yes.  Imagine being asked that by someone you have always looked up to, someone you have always admired, and then they offer you this opportunity. So I grabbed it without knowing what I was about to get into.

When she gave me the details, it was such an exciting project because I also had a friend who was directing for this film. Also, it is exciting to be part of a project that has people who are at the same stage of their careers as you are. It is less risky because you are not the only one.

Pallavi Rohatgi (PR): The interesting thing is that Mira Nair, who was mentoring Rahul Chittella, said that Zoya had been her intern and now, Zoya has Amira. It is such a small world.

ZA: Yes, my first film job was with Mira.

vyg_8826BOI: Supriya, while you were being mentored by Nagesh Kukunoor, was the process the same for you?

Supriya Sharma (SS): Yes, it was pretty much the same. I got a call from Nagesh and he asked me if I wanted to make a film. I said, ‘Yes of course!’ Then, he forwarded me the email that they had sent him and I got in touch with them.

PA: When we thought of this film, we had prepared a list of directors. We thought if these directors don’t say yes, then we would have to approach the next list of directors.

ZA: It was like casting for a film. (Laughs)

PA: Yes, it was.

PR: But everybody jumped on board.

Box Office India
Collection Chart
As on February 18th, 2017
FilmsWeekWeeklyTotal
Jolly LL.B 21
71.87Cr
71.87Cr
Horror Night
1
14K
14K
The Great Leader Kanshiram1
10k
10k
Rings**
1
2Cr
2Cr
Alif249K2.46L
Na Raja - Na Rani - Third Man210K30K
More

Featured Video

Most Viewed Articles

Today

Last 7 Days

Last 30 Days

Twitter

Box Office India's Twitter avatar
Box Office India
@boxofficeindia

#Golmaal4 will start rolling from 9th March t.co/Co16EwUsYZ

Box Office India's Twitter avatar
Box Office India
@boxofficeindia

#JaggaJasoos will probably not release on April 7. t.co/R1fMe0YwjZ

Facebook

Instagram

This Week’s Issue

TRADE GUP

  • Kabir Khan to direct Amitabh Bachchan
  • Jagga Jasoos delayed again
  • Golmaal 4 to go on floors from March 9
  • Divya Khosla Kumar to sign Akshay Kumar for next film

IN CONVERSATION

  • Bhushan Kumar talks about T-Series becoming the leading channel on YouTube.
  • Sarik Andreasyan discusses with us about releasing the first Russian film Guardians –The Superheroes in India.
  • Vipul Mehta is all set to release his Gujarati directorial debut Carry On Kesar.

FEATURES

  • On Location: Bhoomi
  • Monali Thakur talks about crooning the title track of the upcoming film Badrinath Ki Dulhania
  • Armaan Malik tells us about his experience singing songs outside the romantic genre.