PHHIR

Vikram Bhatt and his team are back. This time, Bhatt is not directing. Instead, it’s his story. After carving a niche for horror flicks, he’s delivered a thriller with a touch of the supernatural. It’s a whodunnit with a pinch of karma thrown in. There’s also a woman who claims she’s a medium and can tell you anything you want to know.

Writer Girish Dhamija returns as director after a hiatus. His last film as a director, Yakeen, went unnoticed. This time again, he’s ventured into a thriller. But that’s not where the similarities between his last directorial venture and the latest one ends. If his last film was about infidelity, this one repeats the theme. And his treatment of the film is also the same.

It’s been six years since Dhamija’s directorial debut Yakeen (2005) was released but he’s not budged an inch when it comes to writing (read dialogue) and story-telling. Ironic, isn’t it, that this film should be titled Phirr? So, once again, Dhamija uses the same concept, same backdrop and same treatment.

The film is about Rajniesh Duggal, a doctor married to Roshni Chopra. They are recently married, very happy with each other and leading a successful life. One day, Roshni disappears. Rajniesh meets Adah Sharma, who can sense and predict the future. How Adah helps Rajniesh get his wife back and what happens in the interim form the crux of the film.

The only saving grace is that the first half of the film moves very fast, so quickly that it doesn’t leave you time to think or even blink! But this cuts both ways.

Also, the audience is taken into flashback mode every time the director wants to explain certain scene. It’s a technique we usually watch on television.

A great music score is critical to any suspense thriller, something that serves to enhance the impact of the climax, the moment the culprit is unmasked. But in Phirr, the climax is the weakest aspect of the film. There is no justification for motives and the audience feels deflated when the identity of the person behind Roshni’s disappearance is revealed. Also, there are no lighter moments in the film. Although the editor has tried enough to maintain the tempo, it has left too many questions unanswered.

How one wishes the writer and director had concentrated more on content and less on the visual aspect. Music is all right. Background music is fine.

Performance-wise, Rajniesh Duggal plays his part remarkably. Roshni Chopra looks weird sometimes, and her make-up gives her a comic look. As for acting, well, she tries. Adah Sharma is good. The rest lend adequate support.

Verdict: Flop.

Collection Chart
As on 16th December, 2017
FilmsWeekWeeklyTotal
Fukrey Returns146.93CR46.93CR
Sallu Ki Shaadi102.22LK02.22LK
Galti Sirf Tumhari12.29LK2.29LK
Game Over102.97LK02.97LK
Pyar Se Bolo Devaa110.00K10.00K
Firangi276.00LK76.00LK
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